We recently shared some thinking about how we provide the best service to our customers via Twitter (‘TfL Social Media – Adapting to Twitter’s Changes’).

This has been taken as suggesting that we’re stepping back from providing the full range of information we currently provide our customers and that we object in some way to the changes being proposed to Twitter.  That was not our intention, so we’ve taken down the post.

We’re not going to make any immediate changes to the current range of information we put out on Twitter, which means customers will continue to get everything they are used to receiving.

We’re working with Twitter to ensure that we make best use of their platform and bring customers the messages they want to receive.

We’ve also got loads of ideas about how we use new features and approaches to give customers an even better service on this channel.

We’ll keep you updated with all of that here and really value your thoughts about how we can provide better travel information on all the channels we use.

Posted by Phil Young

Phil is Head of Online at Transport for London, leading the team responsible for tfl.gov.uk, Open Data, social media and intranets.

16 Comments

  1. […] over Twitter. It has removed its original blog post, described and quoted from below, and posted a new one claiming it has no intention of “stepping back from providing the full range of […]

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  2. […] you don’t live in or around London, the Transport for London (TfL) blog is probably not one of your go-to online destinations. But TfL, which manages most of the transit […]

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  3. […] says: don’t worry, we’ll still be providing real time information on […]

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  4. […] after news reports interpreted the post as being critical of Twitter’s changes, TfL has since said that its not making any “immediate changes to the current range of information” […]

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  5. […] you don’t live in or around London, the Transport for London (TfL) blog is probably not one of your go-to online destinations. But TfL, which manages most of the transit […]

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  6. […] Although that decision now seems to have been rescinded, with a TfL spokesman issuing the following statement: […]

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  7. […] In an abrupt about-face, Transport for London (TfL) has ditched its plan to stop using Twitter to provide travellers with real-time updates about London&#82…. […]

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  8. […] In an abrupt about-face, Transport for London (TfL) has ditched its plan to stop using Twitter to provide travellers with real-time updates about London&#82…. […]

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  9. […] In an abrupt about-face, Transport for London (TfL) has ditched its plan to stop using Twitter to provide travellers with real-time updates about London&#82…. […]

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  10. […] an abrupt about-face, Transport for London (TfL) has ditched its plan to stop using Twitter to provide travellers with real-time updates about London&#82… […]

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  11. […] In an abrupt about-face, Transport for London (TfL) has ditched its plan to stop using Twitter to provide travellers with real-time updates about London's t…. […]

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  12. […] In an abrupt about-face, Transport for London (TfL) has ditched its plan to stop using Twitter to provide travellers with real-time updates about London&#82…. […]

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  13. […] In an abrupt about-face, Transport for London (TfL) has ditched its plan to stop using Twitter to provide travellers with real-time updates about London&#82…. […]

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  14. For me, the big problem with TfL’s ‘live’ updates is how often they don’t reflect what’s happening in front of me.

    Most of the time I’m stuck in a big queue outside a station which has been temporarily closed due to over-crowding, the live status is that everything is fine. Technically this is true – because these temporary closures don’t fall within the definition used for the live updates.

    I think that’s a real shame, as it’d be much more useful to be able to look up, say, Oxford Circus station and find that it’s got a 5 minute closure for overcrowding.

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  15. […] In an abrupt about-face, Transport for London (TfL) has ditched its plan to stop using Twitter to provide travellers with real-time updates about London&#82…. […]

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  16. […] you don’t live in or around London, the Transport for London (TfL) blog is probably not one of your go-to online destinations. But TfL, which manages most of the transit […]

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