Tag: TfL apps

DevelopersNewsTech Partnerships

Ticketmaster and TfL Hack Day

It was great to be part of London Tech Week through the excellent Hack Day on Friday June 16, put together by the teams at Ticketmaster and Transport for London. With over 600 apps powered by our data in the market place, I always look forward to these events as it allows me to raise awareness of TfL’s open data approach providing the opportunity for organisations and individuals to develop their own creative solutions.

This has helped to form new businesses, create jobs and launch new customer-facing travel products, giving customers more choice on their devices. A great part of this process is that this type of event is open to everyone at no cost, so we saw students, corporate professionals, freelancers, academics and participants from other sectors.


Read More

DevelopersNewsTech Partnerships

June 16: TfL and Ticketmaster London Hack Day

As part of London Tech Week, TfL are teaming up with the market-leading ticketing company in the UK, Ticketmaster, to host a hackathon at their London HQ. Bring your ideas to life at the London Hack Day, hosted by TfL and Ticketmaster on Friday June 16.

Join us at our hack day in association with Ticketmaster on June 16, part of London Tech Week

Read More

News

Your App – Use of TfL Design and Logos

It’s great to see that there are now over 600 apps using TfL’s datasets to develop customer facing products, and these products have a huge role to play in helping people to move around the capital. The Digital Partnerships team at TfL continues to engage with developers through this blog, the recently launched Tech Forum, as well supporting the introduction of new data with recent examples including Cycle Superhighways, Cycle Quietways and busiest times at stations. We are also looking at ways to improve our data based on your feedback.

Northern ticket hall entrance to Kings Cross St. Pancras Underground station

If your app is using TfL’s registered trademarks or intellectual property, you should amend your design

Read More

DevelopersInformation

Devs – Can You Help Us Provide Better Accessibility Info?

London has one of the most accessible transport networks in the world, but whilst we have made progress on accessibility, we recognise there is an enormous amount of work still to do.

It’s important that wheelchair users know if a station is step-free, and if it is, whether the lifts are working that day.

Read More

DevelopersNewsTech Partnerships

Data in Motion Hack Week is Underway

In partnership with AWS and Geovation, we were delighted to launch our Data in Motion Hack Week, with two launch sessions taking place on Friday 23 September. The launch set the scene for the challenge “Managing the Capacity of London’s Transport Network,” and we can’t wait to see the amazing solutions that are created to support this challenge and help improve the experience of those travelling in London. There are some great prizes on offer for the winners who will be announced at the end of this week. 

Hack Week

We launched our Data in Motion Hack Week on Friday 23 September at the AWS office in London. Judging will take place this Friday when we expect some fantastic ideas to have been developed


Read More

DevelopersNewsTech Partnerships

TfL, AWS and Geovation Hack Week – Data in Motion #1

Join us for a Hack Week launching on 23 September in London in partnership with AWS and Geovation to provide some great products for transport users. The use of our open data sets are fuelling entrepreneurship, accelerating scientific discovery, and enabling Londoners and visitors to travel more easily across the capital.

This Hack Week provides the opportunity to win some great prizes, including 6 months worth of support i.e. office space, business mentoring, access to technical and subject matter experts. So, whether you’re a start-up or a developer, if you are in a position to develop a product that addresses the challenges outlined below, you should join us at the launch event on 23 September. All entries will be judged by a panel in a closed environment to protect your idea.

There are over 500 apps powered by TfL data used by millions of people every day – we would like to see more.

Where and When

Venue: Amazon’s offices – 60 Holborn Viaduct, EC1A 2FD, London and remote access (more detail to follow.)
View on Google Maps
When: Hack for a week: September 23 – September 30, 2016. There will be two launch sessions on 23rd September, at 12pm and 6:00pm, so join whichever one works for you.

Free drinks and nibbles will be provided at the launch sessions.

We're partnering with AWS and Geovation for the Hackathon from September 23-30 and we want your solutions help to manage the capacity of London’s transport network

We’re partnering with AWS and Geovation for the Hack Week from September 23-30 and we want your solutions help to manage the capacity of London’s transport network

Read More

DevelopersInformation

Improved Roads Open Data – Car Parks & JamCams

In my previous post on Roads Open Data I outlined the importance of providing quality data for London’s roads, particularly at a time when our Road Modernisation Plan is being implemented and we are urging drivers to check for disruption before they travel.

We continue to make improvements to our roads open data, with London Underground live car parking spaces availability now available through the Unified API, as well as live video JamCams that give a far better indication of how traffic is flowing in the Capital.

London Underground car parks

London Underground has over 60 car parks with over 11,000 spaces. With the help of our partners NCP and SmartParking, we have released live data showing available spaces for 25 of these car parks. We are seeing whether we can expand the feed to cover all London Underground car parks in the future.

We don’t have this showing on tfl.gov.uk yet, but we’ve made the feed available as open data in the Unified API so that the dev community can have a head start.

You can get the full list of Car Parks from the Places API, which can also be searched by lat/long bounding box or radius. For each car park, we return information such as the address, opening hours, payment methods and facilities, and in some cases, the live occupancy. In the example below, Barkingside Station car park, the OccupancyUrl is returned, indicating that live data is available.

{
  "id": "CarParks_800491",
  "url": "https://api.tfl.gov.uk/Place/CarParks_800491",
  "commonName": "Barkingside Stn (LUL)",
  "placeType": "CarPark",
  "additionalProperties": [
  {
    "category": "Description",
    "key": "NumberOfSpaces",
    "sourceSystemKey": "CarParks",
    "value": "46",
    "modified": "2016-01-07T15:45:43.153"
  },
  {
    "category": "Description",
    "key": "NumberOfDisabledBays",
    "sourceSystemKey": "CarParks",
    "value": "2",
    "modified": "2016-01-07T15:45:43.153"
  },
  {
    "category": "Meta",
    "key": "OccupancyUrl",
    "sourceSystemKey": "CarParks",
    "value": "https://api.tfl.gov.uk/Occupancy/CarPark/CarParks_800491",
    "modified": "2016-01-07T15:45:43.153"
  }...

The URL is based on the place id of the car park, for example “CarParks_800491” so if you know the Car Park id, you can go straight to the occupancy data. We use a separate URL because we have a much shorter time-to-live in our cache for the occupancy vs. the place data (60 seconds and 1 day respectively). In the example below, using Barkingside again, we can see that there’s no spaces available right now.

{
 "id": "CarParks_800491",
 "bays": [
    {
     "bayType": "Disabled",
     "bayCount": 2,
     "free": 0,
     "occupied": 2
    },
    {
     "bayType": "Pay and Display Parking",
     "bayCount": 45,
     "free": 0,
     "occupied": 45
    }
  ],
  "name": "Barkingside Stn (LUL)",
  "carParkDetailsUrl": "https://api.tfl.gov.uk/Place/CarParks_800491"
}

Read More

DevelopersInformation

Is customer flow data useful to developers?

With a real focus on our Unified API and open data policy in recent months, both on this blog and through the Hackathons and events (such as the Urban Traffic Hackathon a few weeks ago) that TfL staff have been involved with, we’ve received lots of great feedback and questions from the developer community, just as we’d hoped we would.  

One such question that has cropped up many times is one around customer volume and flow data, i.e. how can we help developers create apps that take into account how busy certain lines, stations, platforms, etc are likely to be when customers are planning a journey. 

To provide an update on where we are with this data, TfL’s Data Services Manager Ryan Sweeney offers this summary, and asks for your feedback to help us ensure we’re providing data that is both relevant and useful: 

Queen Mary University

Participants at TfL’s Urban Traffic Data Hackathon, held at Queen Mary University in November.

Read More

DevelopersInformation

Unified API Part 4: Roads Data

In Part 3 of this series, I gave examples of finding the ‘Routes of Things’ using the Unified API. This post will focus on roads – how to find and make use of the traffic, road disruption and planned works information on London’s road network.

We’re really keen for customers to check for disruption before they travel on all forms of transport, including the capital’s roads. Developers working with our Unified API have a really important role to play in developing products that meet road users’ needs. This is particularly important as we implement our Road Modernisation Plan – £4bn of investment in improving London’s roads – so planning ahead during these works is crucial for businesses and drivers across the city.

This means that the apps developers create will be meeting a genuine need, and we’re keen to make this process as easy as possible by explaining what data is available, how it can be used, and by taking feedback so we can make improvements.

All of the API examples in this page are live, however they do not include API authentication tokens. This means that if you follow the link as is, you will be using anonymous access, which is throttled for fair use, so you may get a 403 response. It is recommended for your own development you obtain an ‘app_key’ and ‘app_id’ by registering here. The data in these examples will be in JSON format, so installing a JSON formatter plugin in your browser will help you read the data returned.

Let’s start with the most prominent example of the roads information, shown when viewing the Traffic status board.

The Traffic Status Board gives info on all TfL managed routes on the London road network

The Traffic Status Board gives info on all TfL managed routes on the London road network

Read More

DevelopersInformation

Unified API Part 3: RoT – Routes of Things

In Part 2 of this series, Dan gave examples of finding the “Locations of Things” using the Unified API. This week, I’ll focus on the “Routes of Things” – the lines, routes and services that join up the locations on the TfL network.

As before, all of the API examples in this page are live, however they do not include API authentication tokens. This means that if you follow the link as is, you will be using anonymous access, which is throttled for fair use, so you may get a 403 response. It is recommended for your own development you obtain an “app_key” and “app_id” by registering here. The data in these examples will be in JSON format, so installing a JSON formatter plugin in your browser will help you read the data returned.

Let’s begin with the most prominent use of routes on the website – the status board. In the Unified API a line is the top-level entity which groups the routes of a service together. The Line endpoint allows us to request all of the lines for a given set of modes, so is a useful starting point for navigating into the available routes. Showing the status of a line is such a common use case that the endpoint also includes an option to include the service status for each line by appending /Status to the URL:

https://api.tfl.gov.uk/Line/Mode/tube,dlr,overground,tflrail/Status

rot_status

The status board requests the Tube, DLR, Overground and TfL Rail line status. A line can represent multiple routes around the TfL network.

Read More